Ramadan Wreath

One symbol that marks holiday season where we live now is a green wreath hanging on the front door of each house, and bright lights affixed on the outer walls of homes. We enjoy driving around and looking at the brightly lit homes in winter evenings during the holiday season. These are two symbols that are synonymous with good cheer and momentous occasions, and as such I have taken it upon myself to appropriate them and translate them into our own expression of joy and merriment.

I wish I had olive branches to twine together to make a “peace/salam” wreath, but at least I did have a wooden wreath lying around just waiting for the opportunity to make itself useful, so I painted it in three or four shades of green to give it some extra depth and attached some meaningful and decorative extras to symbolize our own holiday. I used all natural materials (other than the paint, which was acrylic, and the letter beads, because I didn’t have enough wooden ones), and hung the wreath on our foyer.

I also hung lights in our rec-room, which doubles as a musallah (prayer room) during the month of Ramadan, and in the living room, where we break our fast, our oldest kids helped with some of that. In the dining room I hung a garland of paper flowers, which one of my kids helped with. We turn on the lights at mughrib (sun-down), and ideally turn them off once we finish tarawih prayers (the extra night prayers during Ramadan).

Although it’s a quiet, understated cheerfulness, I do believe it brightens up our living space, and creates a more celebratory atmosphere.

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